News

President Obama Highlights Disparities in Access to Asthma Care in State of the Union Address

In his opening remarks to the nation in his State of the Union address, President Obama referenced the health insurance coverage expansions included in the Affordable Care Act and said, “A rural doctor gave a young child the first prescription to treat asthma that his mother could afford.” While a positive development, the Academy for Allergy and Asthma in Primary Care remains concerned about the unacceptable disparities in access to care for allergy and asthma treatments. Almost 60 million Americans are affected by allergic diseases, which are largely responsible for the increasing number of children suffering from asthma. Although children of all ethnic origins are affected, asthma is most prevalent in African-American, Hispanic, and low-income communities. By discussing asthma in his speech, the President illustrated the continued need to foster access to diagnosis and treatment for allergies and asthma, particularly for disproportionately affected minority populations. AAAPC is dedicated to the delivery of high quality, patient accessible allergy and asthma care by healthcare professionals in the primary care setting, which is uniquely situated to provide such care.

AAAPC Fights for Minority and Low-Income Children to Breathe Easier

The Academy of Allergy & Asthma in Primary Care (AAAPC)™ continues to be concerned that anti-competitive practices are needlessly limiting access to allergy testing and treatment for millions of patients, including minority children. Asthma affects children of all ethnic origins, but the disease is most prevalent in African-American, Hispanic, and low-income communities. To address the disparity in access to diagnostic and therapeutic allergy and asthma care, AAAPC is working to empower primary care physicians and providers to provide immunotherapy in their offices. While traditionally provided only by specialists, the treatment is safe and effective when provided in the primary care setting. Furthermore, primary care is the only way to ensure that immunotherapy is not restricted to only those with access to the limited number of allergists in the country. Based on concerns that organizations representing allergists have engaged in anti-competitive practices that limit access to allergy and asthma care, particularly for low-income and minority children, AAAPC has filed a lawsuit with the goal of ensuring insurance coverage and reimbursement for allergy and asthma care is fair for primary care and to specialty providers. Details on the lawsuit are available below. Continue reading

President Bullard and AAAPC Brief Congress on Need for Equal Access to Allergy and Asthma Care

AAAPC President Dr. Jeff Bullard this week continued to press for expanded access to allergy and asthma treatment for all Americans in talks with members of Congress and their staffs.  Dr. Bullard explained the important role of primary care providers in reducing disparities in access to asthma and allergy and testing and treatment, including immunotherapy.  The congressional offices appreciated AAAPC outreach efforts and were concerned that so many Americans lack access to such vital care, particularly as more than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies.  Based on Dr. Bullard and AAAPC’s effort, members of Congress and their staffs understand how limited access to allergy testing and treatment can be alleviated through primary care providers who safely offer treatment options, including immunotherapy, in a familiar and accessible setting. Continue reading

Group aims to help PCPs provide allergy and asthma care

A new organization launched late last month serves primary care physicians who provide testing and treatment access to patients who suffer from seasonal/ perennial allergies and asthma. The Washington, D.C.-based Academy of Allergy & Asthma in Primary Care (AAAPC) seeks to help physicians deliver high-quality, patient-accessible diagnostic and therapeutic allergy and asthma care. The group will also work to raise awareness of the link between allergy care and asthma prevention – particularly in pediatric and family practice populations.

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Allergy focus of new PCP organization

As an increasing number of primary care physicians (PCPs) treat allergies and asthma to meet patients’ demand for services, a new organization has officially launched to serve them.

The Academy of Allergy and Asthma in Primary Care (AAAPC) wants to create more access for patients by helping primary and family care physicians test and treat their patients’ allergies safely and effectively,” says Frederick M. Schaffer, MD, chairman of the AAAPC Medical Advisory Board and a board-certified allergist. “PCPs are the medical home for patients, and allergy sufferers want to receive the most efficient and highest standard of care from their family doctor. Patients who suffer from seasonal and perennial allergies want to be treated close to home by the family doctor they have come to know and trust.”

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Academy of Allergy & Asthma in Primary Care Provides a Voice for PCPs for Allergy and Asthma Care and Prevention

PRESS RELEASE

Washington, DC – February 27, 2013 – The Academy of Allergy & Asthma in Primary Care (AAAPC)™, officially launched today as a voice for primary care physicians who provide testing and treatment access to the millions of patients who suffer from seasonal and perennial allergies. The AAAPC mission is to foster the ability of physicians to provide high quality, patient accessible diagnostic and therapeutic allergy and asthma care. AAAPC will be a voice for physicians and patients using allergy and asthma diagnostic and therapeutic services to raise awareness of the link between allergy care and asthma prevention, particularly in pediatric and family practice populations.

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Reduced Physician Compensation and Other Trends in Primary Care

Primary care forms the backbone of the nation’s healthcare system, providing patients with information about preventive and self-care strategies and ideally coordinating care with specialists and other providers. Yet as 32 million more Americans prepare to join the ranks of the insured, the country not only lacks sufficient numbers of primary-care physicians, but medical students increasingly are choosing to specialize.

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Mold growing in flooded basements or other damp spots can cause allergic reactions

For anyone who has dealt with a flooded basement — a not infrequent occurrence in the Washington area, even before Hurricane Sandy — pumping the water out is just the beginning. The lingering problem can have serious health repercussions: mold.“Even with one inch of water, there’s enough humidity inside that mold spores can attach to surfaces and begin to grow. Drywall, carpeting, almost anything indoors can have mold growing on it,” says Cristina Schulingkamp, director of the indoor air quality program at the Environmental Protection Agency’s Philadelphia office. That office has been dealing with the aftereffects of Sandy, which caused billions of dollars in damage along the East Coast in October.

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